Tips and Tricks to Up Your Photography Game

Photography is a complicated art, especially when you consider everything some of the more advanced digital cameras can do. And taking the time to learn a handful of tips and tricks can help you go from taking good photographs to great ones. But which tips and tricks are actually worth your tip? To help you get started, here are some of the most popular ones that even the pros will get behind.

Tips and Tricks to Up Your Photography Game

Back Button Focus

You may be wondering, “What is back button focus? Aren’t normal focusing techniques enough?” While it is true that most people default to shutter focus in the beginning, back button focus can actually offer you significantly more control over your photographs.

Instead of the shutter and focus being operated with a single button, back button focusing lets you divide the two operations. The biggest benefit to the technique is you don’t have to worry about your camera refocusing every time you press the shutter button. And this can be incredibly handy in cases where you want the focus on one point, but your camera keeps trying to default to another.

If you haven’t learned the back button focus technique, now is the time to start exploring the option.

Don’t Rely on the LCD

Many beginning photographers tend to review their photographs on the LCD screen almost right after they have taken them. And while this can help you spot whether a photograph is a complete disaster, it shouldn’t be used for much else.

A camera’s LCD screen is not an ideal screening method. It doesn’t always render the colors accurately, especially in cases where ambient light causes glare on the screen. Instead of determining whether a photo is good or bad from the camera screen, only use it to spot obvious issues. Then, once you get home, review the pictures on a full-size monitor before determining whether there is anything there worth keeping.

You also don’t want to rely on the LCD screen for issues like framing a shot and focusing. It can be difficult to stabilize a camera while holding it at the distance required to use the LCD. And a shaky camera means blurry pictures. The viewfinder is also easier to use under bright lighting conditions, such as direct sunlight and uses less of your battery.

Track Your Remote Shutter Release

Often, a key to catching a create photograph is speed. And you can miss an opportunity if you keep fumbling with or losing your remote shutter release. Instead of letting it bounce around in a pocket or dangle from a cable, consider attaching it to something you can always track, like a tripod.

Just attach some strong Velcro to the tripod and the back of the remote. Then, just get in the habit of always putting it back when it is not actively in use. Once you get into a pattern, you’ll never have to worry about a lost remote shutter release again.

The tips above are designed to help you start on your path to a higher level of photography. After you master these, keep looking for new tips and tricks and implement them one or two at a time. Before you know it, you’ll have a whole new photography game to enjoy and share with others.